Democrats pass bill for sex education in kindergarten in New Jersey

TRENTON, NJ –  A bill passed in the New Jersey Senate will require teachers in public schools to teach sex education to children as young as 5-years-old, in kindergarten.    Hidden inside a bill that claims to provide instruction on diversity and inclusion as part of New Jersey Student Learning Standards in Comprehensive Health and Physical Education is the teaching of sexual orientation and gender identity instruction.

One New Jersey senator said we need to go back to letting parents be parents again in New Jersey. Senator Joe Pennacchio defended the role of parents in the moral and sexual education of their children during the virtual session of the New Jersey Senate.

Sen. Joe Pennacchio defended the role of parents in the moral and sexual education of their children during the virtual session of the New Jersey Senate. (©iStock)

Pennacchio attempted to move an amendment to a bill, A-4454/S-2781, which requires school districts to provide instruction on diversity and inclusion in the curriculum of students in grades kindergarten through 12 as part of the implementation of the New Jersey Student Learning Standards. The requirements under the bill include gender identity and sexual alternatives instruction.

“The Democrat Legislature is intent on imposing its will on parents, stripping away their rights and compromising their God-given responsibility to raise their children as they see fit,” said Pennacchio. “Healthy discussions on racial, cultural and economic differences should be embraced, but our schools should not be commandeered to indoctrinate students about sexual nuances and progressive values.”

Pennacchio’s proposed floor amendments would prevent school districts from providing sex education to children 5 years old or younger under in connection with the instruction on diversity and inclusion required by the provisions of the bill.

“Once again, our state is telling our parents what is and is not in the best interest of their children,” Pennacchio told the Senate. “To restore a modicum of sensibility to this bill, I move that we place the bill back to second reading for the purpose of amendment.”

Pennacchio’s motion was tabled by the Democrat majority, blocked by a vote along partisan lines.